Dakota Access Pipeline intends to work closely with each landowner and local official to answer questions or address concerns they may have on the proposed route, safety protocols, operations, and environmental protections. In addition, Dakota Access Pipeline will document the landowners' rights in a contract that the company will live by and fairly compensate impacted landowners for easements and crop impacts. Property owners are entitled by law to receive compensation for having a pipeline on their property. It is our intent to live up to our promises to landowners and the community of openness, honesty and responsiveness to questions and concerns before, during and after construction and throughout operations.

The following are questions and answers about landowner communications and contacts as well as the easement process, including the rights afforded to each landowner.

  • What is the role of a land agent?

    A land agent's role is to serve as the primary point of contact for landowners along the proposed DAPL route. If you are a property owner that may be involved in the project, your land agent will meet with you throughout the project, share ongoing project information and timelines, and answer any questions you may have. They will also raise any concerns, comments or suggestions you have to appropriate members of the Dakota Access Pipeline Project Team to make sure that your voice is heard and questions answered.

    Land agents may also coordinate with landowners for survey permissions and ultimately easement agreements (i.e. a grant of easement) that meet landowners' individual needs.

  • What is a voluntary land survey?

    Civil, environmental, and cultural surveys along the route are required to complete state requirements for a reasonable route and to discover and document restrictions. The environmental scientists conducting a survey are looking for wetlands, endangered species and habitat. The cultural survey will include archeologists searching for evidence of artifacts, burial grounds, and other historical sites.

    The Dakota Access Pipeline project requests voluntary entry to survey, and makes all efforts to secure voluntary entry. Granting permission to survey land does not give up any rights of the landowner. A survey does not commit the landowner to agree to any form of easement and overall it facilitates the routing of the pipeline to avoid landowner concerns. With open communication, the landowners are able to provide direct comments to the company regarding the routing.

  • What if I do not agree to allow surveyors on my property?

    DAPL's goal is to work with all landowners to obtain voluntary survey permission and to be good neighbors in the communities where we operate. In order for DAPL to meet the Federal and state requirements to route, design, construct and operate a pipeline, we are required to gather civil survey, cultural, environmental and other data. In the event that survey permission is denied, laws in each state we propose to operate may require the project to obtain the court's permission to survey property. In those occurrences where a court order is required for survey, the landowner may be responsible for legal fees related to the proceeding, should the court mandate such payment.

  • How close will the pipeline get to residences?

    DAPL's goal is to work with all landowners to obtain voluntary survey permission and to be good neighbors in the communities where we operate.Pipelines are typically located well away from residences and in no event will the pipeline be located fewer than 25 feet to the centerline of the pipeline. In most, if not all cases, homes will not be located closer than a few hundred feet. The DAPL project team will be able to determine the exact distance from the pipeline to residences once we have completed surveying the proposed route.

  • How wide will the pipeline easement be on my land?

    The final permanent easement will be 50 feet wide. Additionally, for construction, we are requesting 25 to 50 feet of temporary work space in forested areas and wetlands, and up to additional 100 feet for temporary work space on agricultural land. Dakota Access may require additional temporary workspace in certain areas, such as at road, railroad or stream crossings, to accommodate specific construction activities.

  • Will I be able to use the surface area of my easement once construction is finished?

    Yes, in most cases property owners will be able to use the pipeline right of way just as they did before construction. Agricultural activities such as growing crops and pasturing livestock can resume as soon as the land is ready. To ensure safe, long-term operations, some restrictions may apply, including and typically limited to, no permanent structures can be built within the permanent easement and no trees can be planted within 15 feet of the pipe centerline and in some instances 25 feet.

  • What oversight agencies are permitting the Dakota Access Project?

    The North Dakota Public Service Commission, South Dakota Public Utilities Commission, Iowa Utilities Board and the Illinois Commerce Commission will be main agencies in which Dakota Access will file requesting authorization to site, construct and operate the proposed crude pipeline.

    Additionally, the Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration at the U.S. Department of Transportation (PHMSA) is the lead Federal agency that is responsible for ensuring safety in the design, construction, operation and maintenance, and spill response planning of crude oil and petroleum product transportation pipelines.

    Finally, Dakota Access will apply for and work with all other resource and regulatory agencies in each state and locality (as well as relevant federal agencies) to make the necessary filings and receive the required approvals or permits necessary to construct and operate the proposed pipeline.

  • What rights do owners have with respect to having a pipeline located on their property?

    Property owners are entitled by law to receive compensation for having a pipeline on their property. DAPL intends to work closely with each landowner to address specific questions or concerns they may have on the proposed route, safety protocols, operations, and environmental protections. In addition, DAPL will document the landowners' rights in a contract that the company will live by and fairly compensate impacted landowners for easements and crop impacts. It is our intent to live up to our promises to landowners and the community of openness, honesty and responsiveness to questions and concerns before, during and after construction and throughout operations.

  • How and when will property owners be compensated for their land?

    Qualified local real estate appraisers will conduct appraisals to help DAPL assess property values and how those values will be affected by pipeline construction. DAPL will base offers of compensation upon these professional appraisals. Easement payments are typically based upon two categories: 1) Permanent easement, and 2) Property/Crop Damages (non-taxable). Land values historically do not decrease due to the installation of pipelines or utilities. Improvements value could be affected by the installation of pipelines, which will be factored into the easement compensation. DAPL has scheduled easement discussions to commence in mid-December 2014. The information provided below is an indication of the range of values that will be utilized to purchase easements rights across your property.

    Iowa Market Analysis Per Acre
    County Maximum Market Price/acre Average Market Price/acre Median Market Price/acre
    Lyon $16,000 $13,158.33 $13,068.00
    Sioux $21,000 $16,072.44 $15,850.00
    O'Brien $16,000 $12,407.11 $13,125.00
    Cherokee $17,000.00 $9,772.89 $10,647.00
    Buena Vista $15,500.00 $11,499.34 $11,800.00
    SAC $15,500.00 $9,616.33 $9,875.00
    Calhoun $13,500.00 $10,474.89 $10,147.00
    Webster $12,500.00 $9,623.03 $9,776.50
    Boone $13,000.00 $9,530.12 $9,618.00
    Story $16,500.00 $11,606.53 $10,500.00
    Polk $14,500.00 $11,570.36 $12,440.00
    Jasper $16,000.00 $8,471.94 $8,592.50
    Mahaksa $16,000.00 $5,997.16 $5,124.00
    Keokuk $12,000.00 $7,009.86 $7,139.50
    Wapello $12,000.00 $5,288.88 $4,418.00
    Jefferson $12,000.00 $4,779.08 $3,661.00
    Van Buren $12,000.00 $3,432.79 $2,874.00
    Lee $12,500.00 $5,050.94 $4,171.50
  • What happens if a landowner and Dakota Access Pipeline cannot agree on an easement?

    Our goal is to reach an agreement with property owners through negotiations to sign an easement voluntarily at a fair price. Historically, we have reached such agreements with the vast majority of property owners involved with other pipeline projects. In a small number of cases, however, an agreement cannot be reached. At this point, various legal options are available both to property owners and Dakota Access Pipeline.