• What is the Dakota Access Pipeline Project?

    The Dakota Access Pipeline Project is a new underground crude oil pipeline designed to transport 470,000 barrels of crude oil per day (with a growth potential up to 570,000 barrels per day) from the Bakken/Three Forks formations in North Dakota to a terminus near Patoka, Illinois. The project will require the construction of approximately 1,172 miles of 12-inch to 30-inch diameter pipeline through the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois terminating near Patoka, Illinois. The project is supported by long-term binding contractual commitments from shippers and anticipates that the new pipeline and its related facilities will be ready for service in late 2016, pending regulatory approvals.

  • What is the purpose of the Dakota Access Project?

    The purpose of the Dakota Access Project is to safely transport U.S. crude oil from the Bakken/Three Forks formations in North Dakota to a terminus near Patoka, Illinois to support U.S. consumers’ energy needs. The U.S. still imports half of the oil it consumes per day and DAPL will provide a critical link to help close the gap between what we produce as a country and what we consume as we work to be truly independent of energy from unstable regions of the world. Every barrel of crude oil produced in the United States directly displaces a barrel of imported foreign oil. In addition, the Dakota Access Pipeline will reduce the amount of crude oil shipped by truck and by rail and increase the amount shipped by pipeline. Since pipelines are statistically the safest and most reliable mode of transporting crude, DAPL will improve safety to the public and environment and free up rail capacity for the transportation of crops and other commodities currently constrained by crude oil cargos.

  • What company is building the Dakota Access Pipeline?

    Dakota Access, LLC (commonly referred to as “DAPL” or “Dakota Access”) is a company of Energy Transfer Partners formed to safely and reliably transport American crude oil from the Bakken/Three Forks formations in North Dakota to markets and refineries located in the Midwest, East Coast and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Its goal is to relieve transportation strains on rail for crude transportation and safely transport U.S. crude oil to U.S. markets via pipeline to further the goal of energy independence.

  • Where will you build the Dakota Access Pipeline?

    The attached map located at the end of this document illustrates the proposed route of the Dakota Access Pipeline Project. The shaded areas of the map represent the counties the pipeline transverses in the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois. Additional detailed maps can be viewed on the Project Maps page, or may be requested through the project’s toll-free number 1-844-708-2639.

  • When will you build the Dakota Access Pipeline?

    Following a decision from various state utility boards and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration review, our intention is to begin construction in late 2015 or the first quarter of 2016 and bring pipeline facilities in service in the fourth quarter of 2016.

    DAPL Project Timeline

    • 3rd Quarter 2014 Initial Meetings with State Permitting Agencies
    • 3rd & 4th Quarter 2014 Project Open Houses/Informational Meetings
    • 4th Quarter & 1st Quarter 2015 State Applications Filed
    • 3rd Quarter 2015 State Authorizations Anticipated
    • 4th Quarter 2015/ 1st Quarter 2016 Construction Commences
    • 4th Quarter 2016 Facilities In-Service
  • What is the company’s history with pipelines?

    Energy Transfer, and its combined affiliates, is the largest pipeline company in the U.S. by annual volume transported and the second largest U.S. pipeline company measured by infrastructure. Energy Transfer and its various pipelines have provided transportation services since the early 1900s through an extensive network of underground pipelines. Energy Transfer’s crude oil pipeline business consists of approximately 5,400 miles of pipelines. We have designed, built, and safely operated pipelines throughout the United States. Our employees ensure our pipelines operate safely, efficiently, and reliably year round and in compliance with all Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

  • Is Dakota Access Pipeline buying American made products, or foreign products?

    It is Energy Transfer’s policy to buy American made products whenever possible. The majority of the Dakota Access pipeline will be manufactured in the United States (57%), all the pump stations will be assembled and packaged in the United States, and the majority of the remaining project materials will be purchased, manufactured or assembled in the United States, contributing nearly $1 billion in direct spending to the U.S. economy.

  • Is Dakota Access Pipeline buying American made products, or foreign products?

    It is Energy Transfer’s policy to buy American made products whenever possible. The majority of the Dakota Access pipeline will be manufactured in the United States (57%), all the pump stations will be assembled and packaged in the United States, and the majority of the remaining project materials will be purchased, manufactured or assembled in the United States, contributing nearly $1 billion in direct spending to the U.S. economy.

  • Why do we need pipelines?

    Pipelines play a vital role in our daily lives and provide a critical link between the sources of energy in production fields and end-users or consumers. Without pipelines, the majority of the United States would not have access to American oil and natural gas and would have to rely upon foreign sources of less reliable, less available, and much more expensive sources of energy to create products, power our homes and businesses, travel by air, land and sea, and drive industrial and manufacturing industries.

    The North Dakota Bakken has witnessed a significant increase in the production of crude oil, from 309,000 barrels a day in 2010 to more than 1 million barrels per day in 2014. This energy will need reliable transportation networks to reach U.S. markets, and pipelines are the safest, most efficient method of transporting oil, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

    Specially designed, meticulously constructed and carefully maintained to meet or exceed state and federal safety standards, today there are more than 190,000 crude oil pipelines operating in the United States. Pipelines are designed and maintained to last hundreds of years and withstand extreme weather environments.

  • What are the benefits of the Dakota Access Project, including to our local communities?

    The Dakota Access Pipeline will play an important role in increasing America’s energy independence. The pipeline is a means to transport 100% domestic produced crude oil to support U.S. consumers’ energy demand. And every barrel of crude oil produced in the United States directly displaces a barrel of foreign oil that must be imported from unstable regions of the world. The U.S. still imports half of the oil it consumes per day and the pipeline will provide a critical link to help close the gap between what we produce as a country and what we consume as we work to be truly independent of foreign crude oil imports.

    In addition, the Dakota Access Pipeline will improve overall safety to the public and environment. It will reduce crude oil shipped by truck and by rail and increase the amount shipped by pipeline. Pipelines are the safest and most efficient means to transport crude oil, according statistics compiled by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Pipelines are heavily regulated by state and federal regulations and have been subject to regular maintenance, integrity planning, and oversight. Time and time again, pipelines have proven to be the safest and most reliable form of transporting oil.

    Third, the Dakota Access Pipeline will create another reliable transportation route for crude oil from the Bakken. The Bakken and Three Forks areas have witnessed a significant increase in the production of crude oil in the past four years. Through the Dakota Access Pipeline, Midwest and Gulf Coast refineries will have better access to domestically-produced crude oil to meet U.S. consumers’ need for gasoline, diesel fuel and other petroleum products.

    The Dakota Access Pipeline also will ease transportation constraints for agricultural products. The Dakota Access Pipeline will free-up rail capacity for the transportation of crops and other commodities currently held up by crude oil cargos. With more production and lack of pipeline capacity, more rail cars that typically carry agricultural products are being diverted to move crude oil. As a result, tariffs on grain railcars have increased from $50 to nearly $1,400 per car, increasing costs by an estimated $1 per every bushel of corn shipped. The Bakken Pipeline will help ease transportation shortages for agriculture and other industries.

    Finally, the project will bring significant economic benefits to the region that it transverses. During the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, goods and services will be procured from local businesses along the entire route. The spending for goods and services will generate significant sales tax revenue for local economies. The project’s estimated 10,000 temporary employees will be staying at local hotels, eating in restaurants, and shopping in stores. Additionally, the use of local professional services such as engineering, real estate, legal, and skilled trades such as surveying and construction, will generate income tax revenues.

    Individual landowners, as well as the state and counties traversed by the proposed pipeline will benefit. The information below provides a summary of the benefits positive economic impacts expected to be realized by state:

    • Overall Project benefit
      • Total Project cost - $3.8 billion
      • Amount that will be spent in 4 impacted states - $2.5 billion
      • Estimated impact on production and sales - $5 billion
      • Right-of-way payments to landowners – approximately $194 million
      • Labor income (with 50% originating from project region) – approx. $1.9 billion
      • Local use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $10 million
      • Increase in state individual income tax revenue – approx. $28 million
      • State property tax on an annual basis year-over-year – approx. 55 million
    • Iowa
      • State Project cost - $1.04 billion
      • Amount that will be spent in state - $628 million
      • Estimated impact on production and sales - $1.09 billion
      • Right-of-way payments to landowners – approximately $60 million
      • Labor income (with 50% originating from project region) – approx. $390 million
      • State use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $33.1 million
      • Local use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $2.2 million
      • Increase in state individual income tax revenue – approx. $7.7 million
      • State property tax on an annual basis year-over-year – approx. $14.6 million
    • Illinois
      • State Project cost - $516 million
      • Amount that will be spent in state - $367 million
      • Estimated impact on production and sales - $734 million
      • Right-of-way payments to landowners – approximately $31 million
      • Labor income (with 50% originating from project region) – approx. $303 million
      • State use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $16.4 million
      • Local use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $3 million
      • Increase in state individual income tax revenue – approx. $7.7 million
      • State property tax on an annual basis year-over-year – approx. $750,000
    • North Dakota
      • State Project cost - $1.4 billion
      • Amount that will be spent in state - $656 million
      • Estimated impact on production and sales - $1.05 billion
      • Right-of-way payments to landowners – approximately $57 million
      • Labor income (with 50% originating from project region) – approx. $450 million
      • State use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $32.9 million
      • Local use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $1.7 million
      • Increase in state individual income tax revenue – approx. $5.9 million
      • State property tax on an annual basis year-over-year – approx. $13 million
    • South Dakota
      • State Project cost - $820 million
      • Amount that will be spent in state - $486 million
      • Estimated impact on production and sales - $838 million
      • Right-of-way payments to landowners – approximately $47 million
      • Labor income (with 50% originating from project region) – approx. $303 million
      • State use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $35.6 million
      • Local use, gross receipts and lodging taxes during construction – approx. $2.9 million
      • State property tax on an annual basis year-over-year – approx. $13 million

    During the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, goods and services will be procured from local businesses along the entire route. The spending for goods and services will generate significant sales tax revenue for local economies. The project’s estimated 10,000 temporary employees will be staying at local hotels, eating in restaurants, and shopping in stores. Additionally, the use of local professional services such as engineering, real estate, legal, and skilled trades such as surveying and construction, will generate income tax revenues. Individual landowners, as well as the state and counties traversed by the proposed pipeline will benefit with easement and other payments.

  • How safe are crude oil pipelines?

    Underground pipelines are the safest mode of transporting crude oil. Monitored 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year, including rigorous pipeline integrity planning and maintenance, federal statistics show that underground pipelines transport crude oil more safely than ships, rail, or trucks. In the United States, the U.S. Department of Transportation is responsible for ensuring safety of the design, construction, operation and maintenance of interstate pipelines

    Energy Transfer has long standing commitments to the safety of people, the environment, and our property and assets. We do this because it makes good business sense, but more importantly, it is the right thing to do. These commitments are held as fundamental core values and are an integral part of us as a partnership and a corporate citizen. Learn more about our safety statement.

  • How will Dakota Access Pipeline maximize pipeline safety?

    At Energy Transfer and with the Dakota Access pipeline, safety is our top priority. Our goal is to provide safe and reliable transportation of crude oil in the communities we cross and to the customers we serve. DAPL Pipeline implements all state and federal standards into the design and operations of the pipeline and in many instances we exceed government safety standards to ensure a long-term, safe and reliable pipeline. Some of the safety measures we are incorporating into DAPL include:

    • We design, construct, operate, and maintain the pipeline to meet or exceed Federal and safety requirements, and use equipment and materials that meet or exceed industry standards.
    • We inspect every weld that joins each section of pipe both visually and with x-rays.
    • We install pressure and temperature sensors along the pipeline at mainline valves, pump stations, and meter stations to provide triggers to shut off the flow of crude oil through pipe sections in emergencies. These actuators can be triggered within seconds of the identification of an issue and the valve can be shut within minutes of triggering the signal.
    • We inspect and hydrotest in accordance with regulatory requirements as well as published industry standards before placing the pipeline in service.
    • We use both a local and remote controlled emergency shutdown system to immediately and safely shutdown pump stations and the pipeline.
    • We install special regulation devices to prevent pipeline pressure from exceeding safe limits.
    • 24/7 monitoring of pipeline flow pressures by a centralized Pipeline Control Center. Pipeline can be shut down by a Control operator, or deploy local field personnel to manually shut down the pipeline.
    • We perform routine ground and aerial leak inspections of the pipeline at a minimum of 26 times per year. Energy Transfer typically flies the pipeline every 10 days, weather permitting.
    • We test and calibrate controls and safety equipment on a routine basis.
    • We educate the public and conduct damage prevention programs regularly. We conduct and host emergency response drills with our employees and local emergency responders located along the pipeline route.
    • We coordinate with local emergency responders and train local authorities in preventing and responding to any pipeline related problems.
    • We post signs to indicate the location of the pipeline and a phone number to call before digging. We support statewide underground utility damage prevention programs. The Dakota Access Pipeline will utilize the 811 One-Call System.
  • What if the Dakota Access Pipeline is damaged, or the pipeline causes damage to my property, who pays?

    DAPL and Energy Transfer Partners are 100% liable for any damage resultant from the pipeline. The landowner is fully indemnified, except for willful misconduct and intentional harm to pipeline. In addition, DAPL will employ the latest advanced pipeline technology designed to detect any issues at the earliest stage, isolate and confine crude oil to the pipeline, and prevent damage to the local environment.

  • How wide is the Dakota Access Pipeline buffer zone?

    The “buffer zone” is a landowner notification area identified for the purposes of notification in accordance with the state and federal processes. This area is meant to identify the landowners traversed as well as the abutting property owners along the proposed route.

    DAPL originally designated a quarter (¼) mile plus 660 feet on each side of the centerline of the pipeline for landowner notification and survey permission. The reason for this notification distance is so that Dakota Access could determine environmentally sensitive areas and its constructability options for pipeline routing.

    Separately, the pipeline does require a permanent easement area of 50 feet, for which it will compensate landowners. Temporary construction workspace of 25 to 100 feet (additional space) may be required depending on site-specific conditions. Dakota Access will work with landowners to enter into a contractual legal agreement holding the project to certain conditions and ensuring fair compensation to landowners for easements.

  • Will the Dakota Access Pipeline be underground? How deep will the pipeline be buried?

    The Dakota Access pipeline will be underground and covered by a minimum of three feet of soil and more if the pipe is crossing unique land formations, such as agricultural areas, roads, or rivers, lakes and streams. For certain facilities associated with DAPL, such as mainline valves, measurement instruments, testing or pigging facilities, regulating controls and pump stations, these facilities must be located above ground to safely operate the pipeline.

    In agricultural lands, the pipeline will be buried a minimum of 48 inches. There will also be a minimum of two (2) feet separation between the pipeline and existing infrastructure, such as drain tiles. Under roads and streams, the pipeline will be buried a minimum of 60 inches.

  • What is Dakota Access Pipeline’s commitment to protecting sensitive areas and the environment, such as wetlands and culturally important sites?

    As an operating principle, Dakota Access will work with individual landowners to make accommodations and to achieve full restoration of impacted land. DAPL has enlisted the services of Key Agricultural Services and Duraroot, who will serve as independent auditors of the project plans, including agricultural engineers, drainage contractors, agronomists, and conservation planners, who will lend their expertise to discussions between landowners and Dakota Access team to develop plans to mitigate and restore any impacts to agriculture and sensitive lands that may be traversed by the pipeline.

    DAPL has incorporated protection of sensitive resources from the very start of the process to route, design, build and eventually operate a pipeline. During the initial conception stage of the pipeline and its proposed route, we selected a route that avoided and minimized the crossing of sensitive environmental resources as our base routing guideline. This, coupled with avoidance of residences, defines the route initially and then the route is field verified by civil surveys and environmental studies that further identify sensitive areas for the project to avoid.

    During construction and planning, DAPL will take extreme caution when crossing sensitive environmental, wetland or resource areas. In these areas, DAPL will isolate the construction work area with silt fence and other erosion or sedimentation control techniques to avoid allowing sedimentation to enter into the sensitive area. DAPL will also reduce the workspace to the absolute minimum necessary and minimize disturbances to the root systems by only removing the vegetation roots in the trench and passing lanes, both of which are key precautionary measures.

    Additionally, when working in these areas, additional precautionary measures such as isolating fueling equipment or storing the fuels outside the sensitive area to avoid spills, working with low weight-bearing equipment to minimize rutting and separating the top soil from the subsoil to protect the seed bank are all incorporated into the crossing plans. Furthermore and when appropriate, utilization of "trench less" installation technologies, such as conventional bores or horizontal direction drills, where the pipe is installed by pushing and pulling the pipe through the soil with large equipment instead of digging a trench, are employed to minimize impacts. All of the techniques above are examples of how we intend to minimize impacts, but the above is not all inclusive and DAPL’s commitment is to protect and restore the environment to at least similar conditions before we started and in most instances better.

  • What type of restoration will be done?

    As an operating principle, Dakota Access will work with individual landowners to make accommodations and to achieve full restoration of iAs a company, it is the Dakota Access Pipeline’s expectation that our efforts minimize disruptions and leave no long-term footprint. While restoration will be dependent on each individual property, in general, the restoration will include, but will not be limited to, restoring the project area to preconstruction contours and allowing temporary workspaces to return to previous land use.

    Agricultural areas will be restored according to each respective state’s Agricultural Mitigation/Restoration Plan with input from local resource agencies and landowner input. This means that all soils will be placed back into the ditch as they were taken out; the soils will be de-compacted and a native vegetative cover type will be applied to the disturbed portion of the right-of-way; and property specific seed mixes can be applied if the seed mix is available. Restoration in non-agricultural areas will be performed in accordance with Mitigation/Restoration Plans being developed for those areas also with input from local resource agencies and landowner input. Restoration in non-agricultural areas will be performed in accordance with Mitigation/Restoration Plans being developed for those areas also with input from local resource agencies and landowner input.

  • Will Dakota Access Pipeline use existing right-of-ways?

    Dakota Access will study all relevant route options including the use of existing or adjacent right-of-ways. In some cases, existing right-of-ways are being used for electric transmission lines, highways/roads, railroads, or other pipelines and are not available for use of our pipeline, but we will work to parallel as much as possible and overlap wherever possible.

  • What is the role of a land agent?

    A land agent’s role is to serve as the primary point of contact for landowners along the proposed DAPL route. If you are a property owner that may be involved in the project, your land agent will meet with you throughout the project, share ongoing project information and timelines, and answer any questions you may have. They will also raise any concerns, comments or suggestions you have to appropriate members of the Dakota Access Pipeline Project Team to make sure that your voice is heard and questions answered.

    Land agents may also coordinate with landowners for survey permissions and ultimately easement agreements (i.e. a grant of easement) that meet landowners’ individual needs.

  • What is a voluntary land survey?

    Civil, environmental, and cultural surveys along the route are required to complete state requirements for a reasonable route and to discover and document restrictions. The environmental scientists conducting a survey are looking for wetlands, endangered species and habitat. The cultural survey will include archeologists searching for evidence of artifacts, burial grounds, and other historical sites.

    The Dakota Access Pipeline project requests voluntary entry to survey, and makes all efforts to secure voluntary entry. Granting permission to survey land does not give up any rights of the landowner. A survey does not commit the landowner to agree to any form of easement and overall it facilitates the routing of the pipeline to avoid landowner concerns. With open communication, the landowners are able to provide direct comments to the company regarding the routing.

  • What if I do not agree to allow surveyors on my property?

    DAPL’s goal is to work with all landowners to obtain voluntary survey permission and to be good neighbors in the communities where we operate. In order for DAPL to meet the Federal and state requirements to route, design, construct and operate a pipeline, we are required to gather civil survey, cultural, environmental and other data. In the event that survey permission is denied, laws in each state we propose to operate may require the project to obtain the court’s permission to survey property. In those occurrences where a court order is required for survey, the landowner may be responsible for legal fees related to the proceeding, should the court mandate such payment.

  • How close will the pipeline get to residences?

    Pipelines are typically located well away from residences and in no event will the pipeline be located fewer than 25 feet to the centerline of the pipeline. In most, if not all cases, homes will not be located closer than a few hundred feet. The DAPL project team will be able to determine the exact distance from the pipeline to residences once we have completed surveying the proposed route.

  • How wide will the pipeline easement be on my land?

    The final permanent easement will be 50 feet wide. Additionally, for construction, we are requesting 25 to 50 feet of temporary work space in forested areas and wetlands, and up to additional 100 feet for temporary work space on agricultural land. Dakota Access may require additional temporary workspace in certain areas, such as at road, railroad or stream crossings, to accommodate specific construction activities.

  • Will I be able to use the surface area of my easement once construction is finished?

    Yes, in most cases property owners will be able to use the pipeline right of way just as they did before construction. Agricultural activities such as growing crops and pasturing livestock can resume as soon as the land is ready. To ensure safe, long-term operations, some restrictions may apply, including and typically limited to, no permanent structures can be built within the permanent easement and no trees can be planted within 15 feet of the pipe centerline and in some instances 25 feet.

  • What oversight agencies are permitting the Dakota Access Project?

    Yes, in most cases property owners will be able to use the pipeline right of way just as they did before construction. The North Dakota Public Service Commission, South Dakota Public Utilities Commission, Iowa Utilities Board and the Illinois Commerce Commission will be main agencies in which Dakota Access will file requesting authorization to site, construct and operate the proposed crude pipeline.

    Additionally, the Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration at the U.S. Department of Transportation (PHMSA) is the lead Federal agency that is responsible for ensuring safety in the design, construction, operation and maintenance, and spill response planning of crude oil and petroleum product transportation pipelines.

    Finally, Dakota Access will apply for and work with all other resource and regulatory agencies in each state and locality (as well as relevant federal agencies) to make the necessary filings and receive the required approvals or permits necessary to construct and operate the proposed pipeline.

  • What rights do owners have with respect to having a pipeline located on their property?

    Property owners are entitled by law to receive compensation for having a pipeline on their property. DAPL intends to work closely with each landowner to address specific questions or concerns they may have on the proposed route, safety protocols, operations, and environmental protections. In addition, DAPL will document the landowners’ rights in a contract that the company will live by and fairly compensate impacted landowners for easements and crop impacts. It is our intent to live up to our promises to landowners and the community of openness, honesty and responsiveness to questions and concerns before, during and after construction and throughout operations.

  • What happens if a landowner and Dakota Access Pipeline cannot agree on an easement?

    Qualified local real estate appraisers will conduct appraisals to help DAPL assess property values and how those values will be affected by pipeline construction. DAPL will base offers of compensation upon these professional appraisals. Easement payments are typically based upon two categories: 1) Permanent easement, and 2) Property/Crop Damages (non-taxable). Land values historically do not decrease due to the installation of pipelines or utilities. Improvements value could be affected by the installation of pipelines, which will be factored into the easement compensation. DAPL has scheduled easement discussions to commence in mid-December 2014. The information provided below is an indication of the range of values that will be utilized to purchase easements rights across your property.

  • How and when will property owners be compensated for their land?

    Our goal is to reach an agreement with property owners through negotiations to sign an easement voluntarily at a fair price. Historically, we have reached such agreements with the vast majority of property owners involved with other pipeline projects. In a small number of cases, however, an agreement cannot be reached. At this point, various legal options are available both to property owners and Dakota Access Pipeline.

    Iowa Market Analysis Per Acre
    County Maximum Market Price/acre Average Market Price/acre Median Market Price/acre
    Lyon $16,000 $13,158.33 $13,068.00
    Sioux $21,000 $16,072.44 $15,850.00
    O'Brien $16,000 $12,407.11 $13,125.00
    Cherokee $17,000.00 $9,772.89 $10,647.00
    Buena Vista $15,500.00 $11,499.34 $11,800.00
    SAC $15,500.00 $9,616.33 $9,875.00
    Calhoun $13,500.00 $10,474.89 $10,147.00
    Webster $12,500.00 $9,623.03 $9,776.50
    Boone $13,000.00 $9,530.12 $9,618.00
    Story $16,500.00 $11,606.53 $10,500.00
    Polk $14,500.00 $11,570.36 $12,440.00
    Jasper $16,000.00 $8,471.94 $8,592.50
    Mahaksa $16,000.00 $5,997.16 $5,124.00
    Keokuk $12,000.00 $7,009.86 $7,139.50
    Wapello $12,000.00 $5,288.88 $4,418.00
    Jefferson $12,000.00 $4,779.08 $3,661.00
    Van Buren $12,000.00 $3,432.79 $2,874.00
    Lee $12,500.00 $5,050.94 $4,171.50
  • Who is the primary contact for owners of property involved in the project?

    Our goal is to reach an agreement with property owners through negotiations to sign an easement voluntarily at a fair price. Historically, we The land agent assigned to work with a landowner will be primary contact throughout the project. However, if your land agent is unable to address all your questions or concerns, please call the Dakota Access Project toll-free number at 844-708-2639.